Calvert Home School Style

The Calvert Educational Program was a primary middle school in the early 1900’s that was overseen by a Harvard taught educational facilities adviser named Virgil Hillyer. Even though there were multitudes of schools being run in those days, the Calvert Educational Program is one of the only schools that are seen and discussed when the topic of Homeschooling arises. What did Calvert do differently and how did a weekday school settle into part of thousands of homeschooling dads’ discussions to this day?

Primarily, is was this Harvard academician who had the strategy to sell the classroom’s educational program to parents who were unable to send their youngsters to Calvert. This was much acclaimed by the parents because they were then able to give their youngsters the same educative favor at home sweet home as those parents who had the capability to send their little kids directly to the Calvert day school.

As you can picture, this practice did not just stay in the area that the Calvert school serviced. Hillyer decided to examine his market by placing ads in National Geographic for his general education curriculum for only 5 dollars. Since the response was overwhelming, Calvert eventually started to market their full line of study accessible to moms opting for one explanation or another to homeschool their kids. Within 5 years of starting to market this distance-learning curriculum, more than 300 young people were entered in the Calvert method of education in their own homes.

When the 1930’s came around, you not only could track down Calvert core curriculum in the United States, but it was also in more than 50 countries! The US Government even began using the Calvert general studies to instruct soldiers’ dependents who were stationed throughout the pulsating universe. Calvert educational materials in the home are still going strong and celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2006.

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